The Roman Word : Part I
The Roman Word : Part II

The Divine Paradox

Jubilee Memoriam
Thomas Michael Wixted
15 October 1958

Interpreters of the Divine Will

The priestly establishment in Jerusalem 30AD had its own idea of the divine will and saw themselves as its expression. The followers of Jesus took a contrary view and saw Jesus as embodying and projecting the divine will.

The Jerusalem of Pilate and Herod Antipas became a stage where two opposing points of view based on two opposing sets of values was played out.

The Paradox

The Christian churches ostensibly preach Jesus of Nazareth while, at the same time, through their doctrines, they misrepresent him and actually further the viewpoint of those who crucified him.

By means of these doctrines, the leaders of organisational Christendom have achieved, on an intellectual level, what their predecessor priests in Jerusalem had hoped to achieve on a physical level, that is -

The complete destruction of the man Jesus of Nazareth and the principles for which he lived and died.

Erroneous Mindset

It follows from the above that the mindset of the Christian churches is just as erronenous as that of the religious establishment responsible for the crucifixion.

Whose right to choose?

In its self-righteous arrogance, the priestly establishment of Jerusalem asserted that Jesus could not be the representative Israelite, the 'chosen of the Lord' because he did not meet with their approval.

They laboured under the delusion that the choice was a matter for them!

The churches of 'Christendom' are labouring under the same delusion. They, in turn, assert that the 'chosen of the Lord' must meet with their approval, as proclaimed through their doctrines.

God's will and word will not be thwarted, however, and it will one day come to pass that -

"He that sits in the heavens shall laugh: YHVH shall have them in derision.
Then shall he speak to them in his wrath, and vex them in his sore displeasure.
For I have anointed my king upon my holy hill of Zion." (Psalm 2:4-6)

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